KAMIKAZE

A place for Sladists to share their thoughts on Michael Slade and his work...

Postby Cawdorgraves » Thu May 04, 2006 11:47 pm

So working at Chapters is wonderful to expose others to your writings Slade. I have managed to sell all of our slade product thus far. Need to continue to spread the word!

THANK GOD the forum is back online, life as we know it was over.

CG
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Postby MarylandManson » Wed May 17, 2006 1:44 am

Just can't get these words out of my head for some reason...

"Imagine a man
When it all began
The pilot of 'Enola Gay'
Flying out of the shockwave
On that August day
All the powers that be
And the course of history
Would be changed for evermore..."

-N. Peart, Manhattan Project
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Postby Slade » Wed May 17, 2006 5:46 am

MM,

Amen.

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Postby raasnio » Tue May 23, 2006 1:46 am

Cawdorgraves wrote:So working at Chapters is wonderful to expose others to your writings Slade. I have managed to sell all of our slade product thus far. Need to continue to spread the word!

THANK GOD the forum is back online, life as we know it was over.

CG


Whenever I visit my local Borders bookstore I make it a point to check and see if they have any Slade novels in stock. Thankfully they always do. Not all of them, but usually the last three.
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Postby WaywardSoul » Tue May 23, 2006 3:14 pm

Ok MM, one song reference about the atomic bomb deserves another.

"Hiroshima Mon Amour"by Alcatrazz

It was newborn and ten feet tall,
but they called it little boy,
and C7, H5, O6, N3 they called him T-N-T.

The fireball would dim the sun,
promising death in its cruelest form.

Hiroshima Mon Amour
as we beg to be forgiven do you spit
in our face and curse us all.

The fireball that shamed the sun
burning shadows on the ground,
as the rain falls to dry the land,
leaving a desert for the thirsty man.

They all said it would end the war
and we thanked Christ for the bomb,
and the priests and witches all agreed
they should die to keep them free.

The fireball that shamed the sun
burning shadows on the ground,
as the rain falls to dry the land,
leaving a desert for the thirsty man.

Hiroshima!
"Remember, there's a big difference between kneeling down and bending over." - Frank Zappa
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Postby MarylandManson » Tue May 23, 2006 3:51 pm

WS, are those Graham Bonnet's lyrics? They're pretty fair--very Down To Earth, even if he's no Roger Glover in the Eyes Of The World.

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Postby WaywardSoul » Tue May 23, 2006 5:32 pm

Looking at the credits for the Alcatrazz album "No Parole From Rock and Roll", Bonnet and Malmsteen are listed as co-writers on every song.

However, I feel it's safe to say that Graham Bonnet provides the bulk of the lyrics.
Yngwie may be a virtuoso guitarist, but his lyrical ability is horrible!

That's why the Yngwie sampler disc I sent you contains his best instrumentals or covers of other's songs, but nothing with his original lyrics.

Oh, and I appreciate the subtle Rainbow references in your post. 8-)
"Remember, there's a big difference between kneeling down and bending over." - Frank Zappa
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Postby MarylandManson » Tue May 23, 2006 10:19 pm

WaywardSoul wrote:Yngwie may be a virtuoso guitarist, but his lyrical ability is horrible!


Yngwie need never have penned a word, IMO. His position in the whole of musical history is cemented by "Icarus' Dream Suite," about which I can not gush--nor for which I can thank you--enough.

Yes, it really is that good.

As for songs about The Bomb, here's an interesting link. I'm a Kate Bush fan, but I never spotted the "Breathing" reference:

http://arts.guardian.co.uk/readersrecom ... 17,00.html

Cheers! MM
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Postby WaywardSoul » Tue May 23, 2006 11:00 pm

Well, if we're gonna expand the discussion to nuclear war in general, here's a few ditties that qualify:

"2 Minutes to Midnight" by Iron Maiden

"99 Luftballons" by Nena

"Blackened" by Metallica

"Fight Fire with Fire" by Metallica

"Distant Early Warning" by Rush (In reference to the Distant Early Warning Line)

"Electric Funeral" by Black Sabbath

"Mutually Assured Destruction" by Gillan

"Nobody's Fault" by Aerosmith

"Red Skies" by The Fixx

"Set The World Afire" by Megadeth

"Talking World War III Blues" by Bob Dylan

"The Ultimate Sin" by Ozzy Osbourne

"The Unforgettable Fire by U2

"Children of the Grave" by Black Sabbath
"Remember, there's a big difference between kneeling down and bending over." - Frank Zappa
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Postby MarylandManson » Wed May 24, 2006 1:51 am

WaywardSoul wrote:"Distant Early Warning" by Rush (In reference to the Distant Early Warning Line)


Ah, WaywardSoul, I almost springboarded from this into a discussion of similarities between the words and imagery of Slade and Peart, notably on topics like the nature of fear, the components of the brain, China as "the Middle Kingdom between heaven and earth," the Tarot, homesexuality, mob psychology, Africa, motorcycles, concentration camps, and the atomic bomb...then I wondered whether both are driven by "the motor of the Western world, spinning off to every extreme, pure as a lover's desire, evil as a murderer's dream"...but ultimately (and mercifully) I came to my senses and decided to just say,

WaywardSoul wrote:"Distant Early Warning" by Rush (In reference to the Distant Early Warning Line)


...Yeah!

Cheers! MM
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Postby Slade » Sat May 27, 2006 7:51 pm

"You may fool all the people some of the time; you can even fool some of the people all the time; but you can’t fool all of the people all the time."

Quote attributed to Abraham Lincoln, and to P.T. Barnum.

We live in the age when those words have been given stark new meaning by phantom "Weapons of Mass Destruction" in Iraq, which are currently costing the lives of thousands of American soldiers.

Now this:

WASHINGTON (AP) - Former U.S. secretary of state Henry Kissinger quietly acknowledged to China in 1972 that Washington could accept a communist takeover of South Vietnam if that evolved after a withdrawal of U.S. troops - even as the war to drive back the Communists dragged on with mounting deaths.

The late U.S. president Richard Nixon's envoy told Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai: "If we can live with a communist government in China, we ought to be able to accept it in Indochina."

Kissinger's comments appear to lend credence to the "decent interval" theory posed by some historians who said the United States was prepared to see Communists take over Saigon, as long as that happened long enough after a U.S. troop departure to save face.

The meeting with Zhou took place in Beijing on June 22, 1972, during stepped-up U.S. bombing and the mining of harbors meant to stall a North Vietnam offensive that began in the spring. China, Vietnam's ally, objected to the U.S. course but was engaged in an historic thaw of relations with Washington.

Kissinger told Zhou the United States respected its Hanoi enemy as a "permanent factor" and probably the "strongest entity" in the region.

"And we have had no interest in destroying it or even defeating it," he insisted.

Kissinger sketched out scenarios under which Communists might come to power.

Pressed by Zhou, Kissinger further acknowledged a communist takeover by force might be tolerated if it happened long enough after a U.S. withdrawal.

Almost 2,000 more Americans would be killed in action before the last U.S. combat death in January 1973, the month the Paris Peace Accords officially halted U.S. action, left North Vietnamese in the South and preserved the Saigon government until it fell in April 1975.

Whether by design or circumstance, the United States achieved an interval between its pullout and the loss of South Vietnam but not enough of one to avoid history's judgment that it had suffered defeat.


1945 was the year of conspiracies. You read about the one that came out of the European Theater in SWASTIKA. You'll soon read about the one that came out of the Pacific Theater in KAMIKAZE. The United States lost about 400,000 Americans in the Second World War, both theaters. The two atomic bombs dropped on Japan wiped out more than half that number, most of them civilians, in seconds, on two days.

Somewhere along the way, you'll have heard the official line about why President Truman decided to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. I'm willing to bet that it fed you a lot of sanitized facts, and made no mention of this quote from Truman:

"I think one man is just as good as another so long as he's not a nigger or a Chinaman. Uncle Will says that the Lord made a White man from dust, a nigger from mud, then He threw up what was left and it came down a Chinaman. He does hate Chinese and Japs. So do I. It is race prejudice, I guess. But I am strongly of the opinion Negroes ought to be in Africa, Yellow men in Asia and White men in Europe and America."

Question: Should that man have had sole authority to decide whether to drop the atomic bomb on Japan?

When I was in university, I did a year's research into the decision to drop the bomb. As Stephen King says about writing, Eventually, it all goes in. So 21st century events in geopolitics prompted me to delve back into the archives and dig out that research. And as I reread what I had written so many years ago, an allegory - KAMIKAZE - came to me.

"Meet the new boss, same as the old boss..." said The Who in "Won't Get Fooled Again."

Uh-huh.

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Postby MarylandManson » Sat May 27, 2006 11:43 pm

Slade wrote:"Question: Should that man have had sole authority to decide whether to drop the atomic bomb on Japan?


Fascinating question! Answer: Yes.

I'm curious to know when Truman uttered those words. Regardless, he came into the presidency fair and square, and if the newshounds of the time couldn't sniff out his stance, or if his stance didn't matter because enough people shared Truman's views, then he was simply a man of his time and country.

An interesting related question is whether or not the Japanese brought the atomic bomb upon themselves. And that feeds into the question about whether or not Americans brought 9/11 upon themselves. And what if there are consequences heaped upon Americans for Bush's Iraq adventure? Ultimately, in all cases, I say, "Yes. Tough beans."

It's a dangerous world. If you want to be out and about in it, be prepared to get smacked around every now and then, no matter who you are or how great you think you are.

But enjoy it, because, ultimately, it's worth it! No pain, no gain.

Cheers! MM
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Postby Slade » Sun May 28, 2006 10:14 pm

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President George W. Bush has admitted that his bellicose "bring 'em on" taunt to Iraqi insurgents was a big mistake...

MM, is that dead-on Da Vinci code I see hidden in your last post?

"An interesting related question is whether or not the Japanese brought the atomic bomb upon themselves. And that feeds into the question about whether or not Americans brought 9/11 upon themselves. And what if there are consequences heaped upon Americans for Bush's Iraq adventure?"

Indeed.

Think about the most traumatic thing that has happened to you in your life, and how that has affected - and continues to affect - who you are now.

I was raised on Westerns, and that was the central theme. Something bad was done to the hero that riled him to his core, and that made him take the six-gun out of his saddlebag, strap it low-hung on his leg (so much cooler than cowboys who wore it up on their waists), and then ride out looking to settle the score.

SHANE:

Shane: So you're Jack Wilson.
Jack Wilson: What's that mean to you, Shane?
Shane: I've heard about you.
Jack Wilson: What have you heard, Shane?
Shane: I've heard that you're a low-down Yankee liar.
Jack Wilson: Prove it.

THE MAN FROM LARAMIE:

Vic Hansbro: I'm sorry about this. I figured you'd kinda have your bellyful of these parts and would be anxious to get out of here.
Will Lockhart: Yeah, well, I figure this place owes me somethin' and I'm gonna make it pay.

BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK:

John J. MacReedy: You killed Komoko, Smith, and sooner or later, you're gonna go up for it. Not because you killed him, but because of thinking in a town like this you could get away with it.

GUNFIGHT AT THE O.K. CORRAL:

Wyatt Earp: There's always a man faster on the draw than you are, and the more you use a gun, the sooner you're gonna run into that man.

The arrogance of us baby-boomers in the West is that we think that sort of score-settling belongs to us. You know, to the good guys, to the guys entitled to win.

What I've been doing for the past few years is channel-surfing the news. It used to be that the news was hard stuff, but now it's packaged for the audience segment that tunes into any particular channel because it feels comfortable with the slant.

For instance, the deaths in Haditha.

On one American channel, they were fourth down on the headlines, and the anchor must have used the term "possible" unlawful killings, "and we emphasize possible," several times. On a channel from outside North America, the bodies of women and children were shown, with a cut to a black-and-white still of the My Lai Massacre, and then a shot of Iraqi faces reacting to the news.

We in the West have a religious qualm about suicide. We're told it's a sin. So when those first kamikaze planes came diving out of the sky, our fighters embroiled in the Pacific War were shocked to the core of their being. Only madmen would do something like that! A similar reaction hit us hard on the morning of 9/11. What sort of person wilfully kills himself for a cause?

I'm of Scottish heritage on my mother's side. One of the historical quirks that has always puzzled me is why the Roman legions conquered the known world, but when they came face-to-face with the Picts, they simply built Hadrian's Wall across Britain. Is it that we weren't worth conquering, or that they didn't relish stalking religiously-driven headhunters through the misty Highlands?

KAMIKAZE came out of such thoughts tumbling around in my mind. I keep seeing those faces twisted with suicidal rage that get shown on the few stations left that aren't afraid to report - really report (not just the blood on the sidewalk) - hard news. The sort of news that will scare the living hell out the viewer, so that's why it's not shown.

Comfortably numb, as Pink Floyd says.

So let's say that an atomic bomb (or a little "shock and awe," if you prefer) wiped out your entire family. Your parents, your grandparents, your spouse, your kids, the works. How would you react? Maybe it's just my Pictish blood, or maybe it's too many Westerns, but if I were to learn - thanks to President Truman's secret diary found seven years after his death - that the bomb was most likely dropped for all the wrong reasons, we'll...

"There's a lot of talk about fighting to the last man, but only the Japanese actually do it." Field Marshal William Slim. KAMIKAZE (Fall, 2006) is Michael Slade's allegory for the relentless horror we face from the new reality. Genjo Tokuda - an atomic bomb survivor and head of the Yakuza crime syndicate - plans to satisfy the bushido oath he made to his ancestors at the ruins of their Hiroshima shrine: "There's a difference between Western and honorable philosophies. The West tells its soldiers how to live. We tell ours how to die."

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President George W. Bush has admitted that his bellicose "bring 'em on" taunt to Iraqi insurgents was a big mistake...

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Postby MarylandManson » Sun May 28, 2006 11:49 pm

Slade,

Understood! All of which increases the anticipation for KAMIKAZE. And the interesting tangent that ties in with SWASTIKA is this, quoted from the reviews at the home page here on this site:

"President Truman demanded that Paperclip allow no Nazi war criminals to escape justice, so U.S. intelligence personnel sanitized the file on von Braun--the most knowledgeable and valuable of the Nazi geniuses--of all links to the horrors at Dora-Mittelbau."

And here's a link that, even if it doesn't complete the picture, at least raises interesting questions:

http://www.conservativetruth.org/article.php?id=1841

From the link:

"Harry Truman was a bigot."

"Harry Truman was a liar."

Again...

"President Truman demanded that Paperclip allow no Nazi war criminals to escape justice..."

True or false?

Cheers! MM
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Postby Slade » Mon May 29, 2006 6:58 pm

MM,

"What fresh hell is this?" It can't be put any better than those words by the inimitable Dorothy Parker. The trick in being a writer is in trying to anticipate where the world will be two years after you begin a novel. The regular readers of this Board have been able to follow my thinking for at least that long. The day after I wrote the post above, morning brings fresh news:

KABUL (AP) - A deadly traffic accident Monday involving U.S. troops sparked the worst rioting in the Afghan capital since the fall of the Taliban regime, with hundreds of protesters looting shops and shouting "Death to America!" At least eight people were killed and 107 injured, an official said.

Hundreds of Afghan army troops and NATO peacekeepers in tanks were deployed around the city, as chanting protesters marched on the presidential palace and rioters smashed police guard boxes, set fire to police cars and ransacked buildings, including the compound of aid group CARE International.

An Associated Press reporter saw several demonstrators pull a man, who appeared to be a westerner, from a civilian vehicle and beat him. The man escaped and ran to a line of police, who fired shots over the heads of the demonstrators.

The riot erupted in the city's northern suburbs before spreading into the city centre and then to other areas frequented by foreigners, including areas near U.S. and NATO bases.

The unrest started after three U.S. Humvee vehicles coming into the city from the outskirts rammed into a rush-hour traffic jam, hitting several civilian cars, witnesses said.

"Today's demonstration is because Americans killed innocent people," one protester in his late 20s, Gulam Ghaus, said near where rioters burned a police post. "We are looking for foreigners to kill."

AP reporters heard several 20-second bursts of heavy automatic gunfire coming from the direction of the U.S. Embassy. Staff at the U.S. Embassy were moved to a secure location within the heavily fortified building, said an embassy spokesman.

An AP Television News cameraman and an AP reporter were beaten by protesters.

Riots targeting foreigners have broken out before in Kabul, including during the furor early this year over cartoons published in European newspapers of the Prophet Muhammad. Also, last year, a magazine report that U.S. interrogators had sullied Islam's holy book at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, sparked anti-U.S. demonstrations around Afghanistan. In each case, about a dozen people died in the unrest nationwide.


Hmmm. I wonder what's on the Canadian news?

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan (CP) - Five more Canadians were wounded and narrowly escaped more serious injury when a Taliban rocket hit their armoured vehicle near two open ports during an ambush early Monday in ongoing fighting in Afghanistan's Panjwai area.

"They were trying to ambush the ambushers," said Maj. Mario Couture.


Good to know they've got that liberated place under control. I wonder what the news is from the real hotspot?

BAGHDAD (AP) - A cameraman and soundman for America's CBS television network were killed and a correspondent was seriously injured Monday after their convoy was struck by a roadside bomb,

The attack that killed them was one of eight bombings that left at least 33 people dead and dozens wounded, Iraqi police said. It was the worst wave of violence to hit Baghdad in days.

The three were reporting on patrol with the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, when their convoy was hit by an improvised explosive device, CBS said.


The fresh news doesn't look so good, so let's ignore what's happening over there and seek a little comfort in what the local news has to offer for the future over here.

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President George W. Bush has admitted that his bellicose "bring 'em on" taunt to Iraqi insurgents was a big mistake...

The real comfort is that by tomorrow morning everything above will be "old news," and we'll wake up to a brand new day and ask, "What fresh hell is this?"

As Devo says,

"I repeat myself when I'm under stress...
"I repeat myself when I'm under stress...
"I repeat myself..."


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