Slade's World

A place for Sladists to share their thoughts on Michael Slade and his work...

Slade's World

Postby Mbwun » Sat May 06, 2006 6:04 pm

This is a similar idea to the one Starra had in her "Slade's Vancouver" thread, but with a bit of a twist.

I thought that, since I rarely make it into Vancouver, and even if I did I don't have a decent camera for taking pictures, that maybe it might be an interesting exercise to post pictures we find that show how we picture some of locations and whatnot in Slade's books.

So, here's the picture I have in my head of what Robert DeClercq's home looks like:

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This is a photo of a 6.6 million dollar home in Point Grey, Vancouver, located at 1875 Drummond Drive.

And here's how I picture Zinc Chandler spending his down time, having a little fun:

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How hard can it be? - Jeremy Clarkson
Make no mistake, this is a Supercar. Looks good .. goes fast .. nothing else matters. - Jeremy Clarkson

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AMBITIOUS, BUT RUBBISH!
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Postby EZ Rhino » Tue May 09, 2006 4:02 pm

This is what I imagine Katt drives:

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Postby Starra » Sun May 14, 2006 9:54 pm

This is the Dogfish Burial Pole that started the whole Special X story.

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Postby Mbwun » Mon May 15, 2006 3:40 pm

Thanks Starra!

I've lived here all my life and that's the first time I've seen that Dogfish Burial Pole - guess I should get out more.

Nice to have you back. I was beginning to think that you were having so much fun in your married life you didn't have time for us anymore. It's nice to know you're still around. By the way, how goes the job hunt?

Hey EZRhino - that's some kick-ass Honda Civic!
How hard can it be? - Jeremy Clarkson
Make no mistake, this is a Supercar. Looks good .. goes fast .. nothing else matters. - Jeremy Clarkson

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Postby MarylandManson » Thu Jul 27, 2006 6:17 pm

You find shades of Slade in the most unlikely places. I'm reading THE CONCUBINE'S CHILDREN (1994) by Denise Chong, a family memoir about Chinese-Canadian immigrants from the Depression era and onward. No surprise to find references to Vancouver's Pender Street and the Chinatowns of Nanaimo and Victoria. Then I come to this lovely bit:

"...Hing would do what no adult dared--brave the ghosts of the the bone-house, the garage beside the Chins' house. The children peered through the cracks in the wall at the apparently forgotten piles of gunnysacks holding bones of the dead awaiting crating and shipment to China for final burial...Hing's best friend was Elsie...The two liked to ride down back lanes, often stopping at a pig farm, watching squeamishly as men scalded live pigs hanging from hooks."

Ah, Vancouver! MM
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Postby Slade » Thu Jul 27, 2006 7:20 pm

MM,

Connections. You never know when they'll pop up. Years ago, I fought several cases against a Crown prosecutor named Jim Taylor. He later became a judge. Sadly, his life came to a premature end, and over the weekend, I read his obituary in THE ADVOCATE, the in-house magazine for B.C. lawyers.

Here's an excerpt:

Jim Taylor was known at law school for his sense of humor. When Lord Denning attended the law school, Jim and another classmate distributed sweatshirts with pictures of His Lordship on the front and the caption "Leave to appeal refused" on the back. Jim also organized the visit to the law school of that well-known movie star, Jayne Mansfield, who spoke on the topic "Pornography and the Law." Jim presented Ms. Mansfield with one of the Lord Denning sweatshirts, and she graciously put it on. Jim, with his usual discretion, never disclosed the size of the Lord Denning sweatshirt which Ms. Mansfield wore.

Lord Denning played a major part on the Old Board. I still have one of those sweatshirts in my closet.

http://www.legalhumour.com/denning.asp

Jayne Mansfield - the legend goes - was beheaded in a car accident. The thought of that, because I'd met her at law school, got mixed up in the inspiration for HEADHUNTER.

Until last weekend, I never knew Jim was behind both visits.

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Postby WaywardSoul » Thu Jul 27, 2006 8:59 pm

I've heard the legend of Mansfield's beheading and believed it to be true for many years, until I happened to catch a documentary on classic cars showing on the History Channel( I'm what some may call a gearhead).

One of the cars featured was the Buick Electra, which was the vehicle Mansfield was riding in when the fatal crash occured. A brief segment followed which debunked the beheading rumor.

"Although Mansfield's actual mode of death was gruesome, she was not beheaded. According to the police report on the accident, "the upper portion of this white female's head was severed." Her death certificate notes a "crushed skull with avulsion (forcible separation or detachment) of cranium and brain." One thinks of a beheading as the neck's being sliced through, causing the head to be separated from the body, but that is clearly not what happened here. Scalping is perhaps a closer description of Mansfield's fate, but even that word does not accurately reflect the cranial trauma she suffered, because scalping victims at least retain an intact skull. The Angel of Death did not afford Mansfield this luxury: Her skull was cracked or sliced open, and a sizeable piece of it was carried away".

http://www.snopes.com/movies/actors/jayne.htm
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Postby Slade » Thu Jul 27, 2006 9:25 pm

WS,

I read that just before I posted, and reworked the line to read: Jayne Mansfield - the legend goes - was beheaded in a car accident.

The legend, of course, was the HEADHUNTER inspiration.

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Postby WaywardSoul » Thu Jul 27, 2006 10:23 pm

Wasn't sure if you knew the real story or not.

Truth or legend, it certainly was the inspiration for one hell of a first offering from my favorite writer.

Doesn't the genesis for HEADHUNTER date back to your childhood experience with the magazine cover depicting a severed head, or am I confusing that with the same scene in the SpecialX series?
"Remember, there's a big difference between kneeling down and bending over." - Frank Zappa
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Postby Slade » Thu Jul 27, 2006 11:39 pm

WS,

You're right, that was the deep source of the story, but how I knew that was the plot to write was 1/ the effect that Mansfield's "alleged" beheading had on everyone, and 2/ the fact that people recalled years apart that two traffic victims were beheaded in car accidents at the same spot on the Granville Bridge off ramp. That got me thinking, "What is it about beheading that jars us to the point that out of thousands of car accidents, those get remembered?"

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Postby mihntr » Fri Jul 28, 2006 2:53 pm

Slade.I think people remember beheadings for several reasons.First theres all of the history behind beheading from john the baptist in the bible to the reign of terror in the french revolution.beheadings are some of the most written about types of executions.second beheadings must be horrible to watch for anyone unlucky enough to be there. and frightening visual images seem to stay with people the longest. finally theres the old legend about hte brain still functioning after seperation.makes people wonder if the victim saw what happend afterward peace. ken
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Postby Slade » Tue Oct 16, 2007 12:47 am

Today, a Mountie's funeral was held in Ottawa. Click on the larger photo images and note what his infant daughter is wearing:

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/s ... hub=Canada
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Postby red devil » Tue Oct 16, 2007 8:02 am

that is really touching :(
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Postby raasnio » Tue Oct 16, 2007 10:24 pm

Yes, it is.

Slade: Is it customary for a child to wear that at a funeral for a deceased parent?
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Postby Slade » Tue Oct 16, 2007 11:21 pm

raasnio,

I've never seen that before. But we can imagine that young girl with no memory of her father pulling that tiny tunic out of her clothes closet years from now and feeling a link to him because the Mounties have forged the red serge tunic into an iconic myth.

"I know who you were, Dad. You wore it well."

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