Serial Killers

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Re: Serial Killers

Postby Slade » Thu Jun 28, 2012 7:46 pm

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/ ... pital.html

This reminds me of a book I read in my teens: A PUZZLE FOR FOOLS by Patrick Quentin:

The main character in A Puzzle for Fools is Peter Duluth, a theatrical producer who hit the bottle a little too hard after the death of his wife in a fire. Eventually, he realised he was throwing his life away and his friends were getting tired of being sorry for him, so he decided to fix his life while he still had the chance. He enrols in a sanatorium run by the very modern Dr. Lenz, who prefers his patients to feel like on some sort of vacation, and not in a sanatorium.

The opening scene catapults the reader into what is a compelling, fast-paced read. Peter Duluth is getting ready to go to bed when he hears a voice—his own voice—speak to him; “There will be murder…” He becomes panicked and causes a scene, running away from his room and, to his surprise, into the room of the daytime nurse, Miss Brush, who asks one of the attendants to escort him to Dr. Lenz. Lenz listens to Peter’s story and confides in him: there seems to be a malevolent influence in the sanatorium.
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Re: Serial Killers

Postby dreab trawets » Sun Jul 01, 2012 6:45 pm

Not a serial killer as we might know it. But she did kill many.


She carried typhoid b, but only infected others.


http://history1900s.about.com/od/1900s/ ... idmary.htm
“After my head has been chopped off, will I still be able to hear, at least for a moment , the sound of my own blood gushing from my neck? That would be the best pleasure to end all pleasure. “
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Re: Serial Killers

Postby Tautriadelta » Wed Aug 29, 2012 4:45 pm

2 stories that really hit my sensitive area and had me pretty much stumped is
Jesse Pomeroy
http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/seri ... roy/1.html
and Mary Bell
kids who kill.....damn

don't know if you fine Sladists ever went to this site but it has a little of something for everyone it's called...
http://www.dreamindemon.com/
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Our love and toil in the years to be;
When we are grown and take our place
As men and women of our race.
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Re: Serial Killers

Postby Mbwun » Mon Jun 09, 2014 4:16 pm

Kim Rossmo has been doing some new forensic analysis of the Jack The Ripper case:

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/wo ... 945578134#

Just in case the above doesn't see fit to give you the entire article, this is what Mr. Rossmo posted to Facebook today:

Jack the Ripper hunted near home, new forensic analysis finds

HANNAH DEVLIN
June 6, 2014

QUEEN Victoria's grandson, the Duke of Clarence, and the artist Walter Sickert have been in the frame, but a forensic analysis by a US criminologist now suggests that Jack the Ripper was a down-at-heel nobody who lived on one of London's seediest streets.
Kim Rossmo, of Texas State University, has pinpointed Flower and Dean Street, in Whitechapel, as the most likely base for the notorious serial killer. Professor Rossmo, who used statistical geographic profiling techniques in the analysis, said the theory was supported by circumstantial evidence linking each of the victims to the location.
"I would be surprised if he had no association at all there," he told The Times Cheltenham Science Festival yesterday. "I have a reasonable degree of confidence that he based his hunt there."
Early in the investigation, police notes suggested that the street, which was lined with brothels, dingy pubs and "flop" houses, "should be the epicentre of their search" and door-to-door inquiries were conducted there in 1888. However, Professor Rossmo said that more recent "Ripperologists" had dismissed the location because it did not fit any of the prominent suspects.
"People who try to solve the Jack the Ripper case commit the same logical fallacies as you see in wrongful conviction cases," he said.
"Normally an investigation starts with the evidence and moves up to the suspect. If you move prematurely to a suspect-based investigation you run the risk of wrongful conviction."
The Duke of Clarence was claimed to have committed the killings after syphilis caused him to go insane — even though he was in Scotland at the time of two of the killings.
Patricia Cornwell, the crime writer, accused Walter Sickert, saying that a letter purportedly sent by the Ripper bore an unusual watermark found on the artist's writing paper.
Geographic profiling works by analysing the distribution of crime scenes. Murderers tend to strike close to a location to which they have a strong link, normally their home or workplace — but not too close. When mapped out as probability contours on a map, this creates a volcano-shaped distribution with the killer's "base" in the hollow at the centre.
When the locations of the Ripper's five known crime scenes were fed into the algorithm, Flower and Dean Street came out as the most likely location.
All five women in the Ripper case lived very close to Flower and Dean Street. His final victim, a prostitute called Mary Kelly, was last seen picking up a customer a few streets away.
The bloodstained apron of his fourth victim, Catherine Eddowes, was found halfway between the murder scene and Flower and Dean Street, consistent with the route the Ripper might have taken home.
Steve Le Comber, of Queen Mary University of London, who has collaborated on the analysis, said that the technique could have helped police to focus their investigation at the time. "None of this is going to say this is who it is," he said. "But it tells you the order to search the haystack."
A psychological profile of Jack the Ripper by FBI scientists suggested that he was probably an unmarried loner, aged 28 to 36 and possibly working as a mortician's helper or a butcher.
Professor Rossmo argues that there may be an uncomplicated reason why the murders stopped. "In 1895, the lifespan was early to mid-40s," he said. "Maybe he just dies."

The Times
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AMBITIOUS, BUT RUBBISH!
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Re: Serial Killers

Postby Mbwun » Mon Feb 09, 2015 7:54 pm

So, it would appear that Charlie Manson's fiancee only wanted to marry him for his body:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/peopl ... 34793.html
How hard can it be? - Jeremy Clarkson
Make no mistake, this is a Supercar. Looks good .. goes fast .. nothing else matters. - Jeremy Clarkson

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Re: Serial Killers

Postby Mbwun » Mon May 18, 2015 6:40 pm

Here's some folks that dreab trawets should enjoy reading about.

http://io9.com/historys-six-most-hideou ... socialflow
How hard can it be? - Jeremy Clarkson
Make no mistake, this is a Supercar. Looks good .. goes fast .. nothing else matters. - Jeremy Clarkson

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Re: Serial Killers

Postby dreab trawets » Wed May 20, 2015 3:35 pm

oooh yeah..

family sticking together

nice find
thank you
“After my head has been chopped off, will I still be able to hear, at least for a moment , the sound of my own blood gushing from my neck? That would be the best pleasure to end all pleasure. “
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